HIGHLIGHT - HOW TO SEE

Every year, thousands of lenses that don’t meet quality standards are thrown away. This can happen due to problems in applying coatings or other treatments. How can we make use of this waste in order to reduce its impact on the environment?





Divel

Highlight, lighting made from rejected lenses


Every year, thousands of lenses that don’t meet quality standards are thrown away. This can happen due to problems in applying coatings or other treatments. How can we make use of this waste in order to reduce its impact on the environment?

Divel, working with third-year students of Industrial Design, coordinated by professor Dario Russo at the University of Palermo, has come up with an answer. In response, these university students, assisted by designers Federica Ditta and Cristiano Pesca, worked on an original, environmentally sustainable design project.


Beginning with an initial analysis of strategies, targets, products, and marketing efforts of Divel Italia, the students conducted a circular analysis in order to come up with the final output.

The central stages of the analysis looked at the state of the art, past projects of reuse and recycling, metaphors and, finally, visual aspects.

The students and designers focused on the concept of waste and on the emotive qualities hidden within a lens, which remains an effective product despite the imperceptible technical defects in manufacture that have resulted in it becoming waste.

From this basis, they then analyzed how the lenses interact with light and the characteristics of that light, including the generation of phenomena like rainbows, caustics, backscatter, and aurora. Each student analyzed each of these phenomena in great detail (e.g. what it is, how it works, why it comes about, and the behavior of the rays of light).

After this, they sought to reproduce these effects by having the lenses interact with sources of light.


This gave rise to the Highlight line of lighting products—including floor lamps, table lamps, ceiling and wall lamps—that reproduce these optical effects. This was followed by another philosophy embodied in the Fossili 2000 line, made using waste cuttings from the shaping of lenses.

These designer lamps will be on display at the Design & Territori exhibit to held in Turin, Italy, this March.

The Highlight ceiling lamp, which produces a two-color refraction effect, and wall lamp, which reproduces an aurora effect, will be displayed at our MIDO 2020 stand.


The designers Federica Ditta and Cristiano Pesca continued their collaboration together with Divel by creating the "Iceberg" eco-couvettes (read more) and the "Fossili" displays (read more), always using Divel Italia lens scraps.



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